If the novel coronavirus has reinforced anything, it’s the idea that there are things we can control, and things we can’t. While many eagerly await a vaccine or effective treatments, there are many actions you can take to strengthen your system’s defenses.

We already know about the recommendations by the CDC, and hopefully, you had a chance to read our recent article, Immunity During the Coronavirus and Beyond, published in the spring. While these steps will not prevent you from getting ill, here are 5 actionable strategies to support your health and immunity this season with the coronavirus still lingering.

Add in a salad

Summer is a time we typically lighten up our meals. This is a great opportunity to add a rainbow of color: red tomatoes for lycopene, an antioxidant, and vitamin C; orange carrots for fiber and vitamin A (beta carotene); yellow peppers for fiber, potassium, and vitamin C; green celery and cucumber for a host of minerals, including potassium to positively impact blood pressure; purple cabbage for anthocyanins, another antioxidant, as well as a host of vitamins and minerals.

Try out the farmer’s market

Many farmer’s markets will be opening this month. This is a great way to support local farmers, while getting fresh air and sunlight. You will be reducing your intake of industrial and artificial chemicals such as pesticides, herbicides, hormones, additives, and preservatives, all of which contribute to your toxic load and undermine health.

Reconnect with nature

While observing local and state guidelines, head out to a park, forest, or beach. There are mental and physical health benefits to spending time in nature such as reduced stress, improved sleep, increased happiness and positivity, and improved focus and creativity. Aim for 120 minutes per week for maximum benefit, according to researchers.

Try fermented, probiotic foods

By now you’ve heard about the importance of a healthy microbiome, the trillions of bacteria that live in and on your body. At your next barbecue, try raw sauerkraut instead of conventional. Replace your usual beer with kombucha, an effervescent tea. Miso is not just for soup; add some miso paste into a homemade dressing, marinade, or sauté.

Open the windows

Indoor air pollution can come from chemicals in furniture, carpets, smoke, air fresheners, and conventional cleaning products. These can impact sleep, respiration, energy, and irritate the eyes, nose, and throat. Now that allergy season is ending, open windows to bring in fresh, clear air. The breeze may also be a cost-saving alternative to air conditioners.

For more easy and accessible ways to support your wellness goals, ask about our virtual integrative mind-body health or health and lifestyle coaching services. Call 201-488-6678 or visit specializedtherapy.com

By Anna Sandbank, LCSW, INHC, Director of Integrative Mind-Body Health, Specialized Therapy Associates, Fx Med Centers, Xceptional You

Disclaimer: This post is for informational purposes only. It does not constitute medical advice, or replace treatment or intervention by a qualified medical or mental health professional.